Weekly Actions | 3.13.17

Here are this week’s federal actions—taken from an email Indivisible sent out on Monday:

Healthcare repeal update: We’re still waiting for that CBO score…

House Republicans moved their repeal bill ahead in the House Ways & Means and Energy & Commerce Committees this week without a score from the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) revealing how much the bill is going to cost. So much for all that talk of fiscal responsibility!

The score will be coming as soon as today, and Republicans know it’s going to be bad—that’s why they’re already at work trying to undermine the CBO. Meanwhile, a study by the Brookings Institution estimates that at least 15 million Americans will lose health insurance. This is completely unacceptable—and your MoCs need to keep hearing that message from you.

Need resources on the health care bill? Unlike Republicans, we’ve got you covered.

  • We’ve collected all our materials on health care together so that you can find our brand new script plus talking points, district-level data, legislative process explainers, and more in one place: Save the ACA.
  • Last week, we joined up with health care experts from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, Families USA, and Planned Parenthood Action for an emergency call providing an overview of the American Health Care Act and what you can do to stop the repeal of the ACA. If you missed it, you can listen to the recording here.
  • Make sure you know where your MoC stands with this handy tracker from NPR.

More Capitol Hill highlights

Want more to talk about with your MoCs’ offices this week after you’re done reminding them how you feel about saving health care? We’ve got a few suggestions:

  • In the House of Representatives: Stop the secrecy around Trump’s taxes.
    We’re all still being kept in the dark about Trump’s conflicts of interest—including information that could be important to revealing further ties between Trump and Russia. Rep. Bill Pascrell (D-NJ) has introduced a Resolution of Inquiry (H.Res. 186) directing the Treasury Secretary to provide to the House of Representatives Trump’s tax returns from 2006 through 2015, as well as other financial documentation. If you think that Trump’s tax returns need to be made public, tell your MoC to cosponsor H.Res. 186. Here’s our background and script for asking your Representative to cosponsor the resolution.
  • In the Senate: The Most Boring and Dangerous Bills You’ve Never Heard Of.
    Yes, even as former congressional staffers, our eyes glaze over at the mention of “regulatory rollback.” You know who doesn’t think this is boring? Corporate lobbyists—and they’re hoping you don’t notice. The Searching for and Cutting Regulations that are Unnecessarily Burdensome (SCRUB) Act (H.R. 998) would create an unelected board to make recommendations to Congress on cutting regulations. This may not sound like a big deal—but it is. It’s a quiet way to give big business a big gift: the end of regulations essential to protecting our environment, health, and workplace safety. This bill has already passed the House and is currently before the Senate: here’s our script for telling your Senator to vote NO on this dangerous legislation.As if that weren’t bad enough, the Senate is also considering the Regulations from the Executive in Need of Scrutiny (REINS) Act (S. 21), which requires congressional approval for a huge number of regulations. This bill would put corporate lobbyists in the driver’s seat—taking aim at the health and safety protections Americans depend on. REINS is a truly reactionary, fundamental reworking of the federal government, and not in a fun way. It’s been called “the most dangerous bill you’ve never heard of.”

Extra credit: want to learn more about the legislative process? We’ve got a new explainer on House of Representatives Committee Action.

Looking ahead: Stop Gorsuch

America has never been more in need of an independent judiciary. With President Trump escalating his attacks on our most basic rights, the courts are our last safeguard. And with the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch, a right-wing apologist (more conservative than Scalia!), to the Supreme Court, Trump has made it clear that he hopes to enshrine his agenda through our nation’s judiciary too.

That’s why we’ve joined The People’s Defense, a campaign bringing together grassroots activists to fight the appointment of any Supreme Court Justice who will not stand up to this president. Gorsuch’s first hearing in the Senate Judiciary Committee is March 20, and Senate Republicans are trying to force a final vote before Senators go home during the April recess to face you. It’s time to step up our game.

  • Visit The People’s Defense and read about why Gorsuch is bad for American families. Use this information to call your Senators and tell them to oppose Neil Gorsuch. Spread the word on social media, at your Indivisible meetings, and with your friends and family on why Gorsuch is a dangerous pick for an independent judiciary.

Here are this week’s state-level actions:

HB17-1156 is headed to the Senate.

The bill prohibits licensed medical physicians from subjecting children and young adults to the harmful practice of “gay conversion” therapy. In order for the bill to come to a full vote on the Senate floor, it must pass through Senate committee first. The Senate President decides which committee each bill goes to, and in doing so, has the power to determine its fate. Email President Grantham and ask him to give HB17-1156 a fair committee hearing and to put it up for a full vote on the Senate floor. You can email him asking for a fair hearing here.

Senate Bill 17-071 came before the State Affairs Committee.

This bill significantly rolls back early voting options for voters across the state. This is a possible effort to reduce access for voters. Steve Fenberg introduced seven different amendments to ensure that adequate services would still be accessible to voters. Unfortunately, each one of these amendments died on a party-line vote. We need to monitor the progress of this bill and ensure it doesn’t get passed as it stands now.

 

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